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Alexis Wakefield

I live in one of these homes and my Grandmother was Martha Wakefield. I grew up in this community and it is beautiful. It was my Grandma's dream to create such a unique and beautiful place. I wouldn't say that this community is little known outside of Ohio because I've been there while my Grandma has been interviewed and we even had architects come all the way from Australia to see our home and the other houses in Rush Creek. I was there when the NY Times came to interview her and they made that article! The New York Times didn't miss the house in Oberlin it's just that the article was about Rush Creek homes not all the home Wright style in Ohio. My Grandma also designed houses outside of Rush Creek, some in Ohio and some in other states. She was a brilliant architect and an amazing woman. The only thing I don't like about Rush Creek is the newer owners are coming in and gutting the house, ripping out all the built-in furniture and just discarding thousands of dollars of mahogany and white pine. They are disgracful and shouldn't be allowed to live in these works of art. The truth about it is my Grandma was the only thing holding these people back, but as soon as she passed on our neighbor proceeded to rip out furniture and shelves and I don't even want to see the inside anymore! People come into these homes and mess them up by trying to do their own thing, but the point of living in one is so you don't have to do anything you have all the custom made furniture and the built-in lounges and beds. Why would you rip them all out to put a couch in? I just had to get that off my chest because I was basically raised by my Grandma and she told me her whole story and about the designing and my Grandpa, Richard Wakefield, drawing up the blueprints and building the homes. She led me through what to say when I give a tour of the home, I was like her apprentice. The well being of her designs is of great importance to me and it's a shame that these people are so foolish to DESTROY the original homes to put in futon!! It makes me very angry when I look across the street and see that my neighbor has a huge pile of discarded wood from ripping out furniture and shelves and the like. I love this place more than any other and it is beautiful and yes, you should make time to visit and enjoy its serenity.

brian makse

Rush Creek is brilliant, make the time to see it.

Could it be a modernist's utopia?

Ed Jarolin

Very informative, but leave it to the New York Times to miss the Wright Usonian open to the public in the state they're writing about; the Weltzheimer House in Oberlin, Ohio. Also, Usonian a combo of U.S. and "useful", I don't think so. A valuable article anyway, thanks for posting it.

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